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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Philipp Missfelder
Coordinator for Transatlantic Cooperation, Germany
KQED 01/30/2014
Warner: The German Magazine "Der Spiegel" revealed, based on the Snowden papers, that in fact, right on top of the new U.S. embassy right next to the Brandenberg Gate is one of these supersecret intelligence collection hubs. And in fact, it's used to spy on all these government buildings. What did you think when you learned that? Missfelder: I was really shocked because if you find out these kinds of details. Everybody is shocked because then you know who it was, when it was, where it was and this is something completely different. And it becomes so concrete. Warner: Has Angela Merkel's government received any satisfaction from the Americans on any of these issues other than not spying on her cell own? Missfelder: Honestly so far not. We haven't had the progress yet we need and I hope we are able to manage it until the Chancellor has her visits in June in America.
Amy Goodman
Host and Executive Producer for Democracy Now
LINKTV 01/30/2014
Goodman: Snowden's latest disclosures, the Huffington Post reports the NSA spied on foreign governments before and during the 2009 U.N., Climate Summit in Copenhagen. An internal NSA document says it's analysts and foreign partners briefed U.S. Negotiators on other countries preparations and goals, saying --
Eric Holder
U.S. Attorney General
LINKTV 01/30/2014
Goodman: Also testifying in Wednesdays hearing, Attorney General Eric Holder said he believes the bulk collection of phone records is constitutional but will be reformed on the orders of President Obama. Holder: I would say 15 judges in the FISA court, to judges, one in California and one in New York, have looked at this question and a determination that the 215 program is in fact constitutional. One judge in Washington, D.C. has decided it is not. But I think it only deals with half of the question. I believe they are correct that it is constitutional, it is an appropriate use, in a Constitutional sense of the government’s power. But the question is –and what the President has posed to us, just because we can do something, should we do it?
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
ALJAZAM 02/03/2014
Gizbert: Snowden used an interview with the New Yorker Magazine to accuse the U.S. mainstream media of abdicating their ability to hold power to account. He was talking about interviews done January 19th by Mike Rogers and Dianne Feinstein. Rogers: I believe there is a reason he ended up in the hands -- the loving arms of an FSB agent in Moscow. Gizbert: The two had congressional intelligence committees both muse allowed on the possibility that Snowden, exiled in Moscow has been working for the Russians all along. Snowden denies that and says “it is not the smears that mystify me. It’s that outlets report statements that speakers themselves admit are sheer speculation.” He added “It’s just amazing that these massive media institutions don't have any sort of editorial position on this. I mean these are pretty serious allegations.”
James Comey
Director of the FBI
CSPAN2 02/04/2014
Rogers: There have been discussions about selling of access to this material to both newspaper outlets and other places. Mr. Comey, to the best of your knowledge is fencing stolen material, is that a crime? Comey: Yes, it is. Rogers: And would be selling the access of classified material that is stolen from the United States government, would that be a crime? Comey: It would be. It's an issue that can be complicated if it involves a news gathering news promulgation function, but in general fencing or selling stolen property is a crime. Rogers: So if I am a news report for fill in the blank and I sell stolen material is that legal because I am a newspaper reporter? Comey: Right, if you’re a newspaper reporter and you’re hawking stolen jewelry it’s as a crime.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 02/04/2014
Rogers: If I am hawking stolen classified material that I’m not legally in possession of for personal gain and profit, is that not a crime? Comey: I think that's a harder question because it involves a news gathering function. Could have first amendment implications. It’s something probably be better answered by the Dept. of Justice. Rogers: So entering into a commercial enterprise to sell stolen material is acceptable to a legitimate news organization? Comey: I’m not sure I’m able to answer that question in the abstract. Rogers: It’s something we should think about, is it not? Comey: Certainly. Rogers: And so If there are accomplices in purveying stolen information shouldn't we be concerned about that? Comey: We should be concerned about all of the facts surrounding the theft of classified information and it’s promulgation.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 02/04/2014
Rogers: And interesting, over the, again, the Munich conference where we had individuals tell us that in fact there are individuals who are saying to be in possession of this information who are eager to sell this information to other news organizations. Would that be a legitimate exercise on behalf of a reporter? Comey: That’s a question now you’re getting from the general to the particular. I don’t want to talk about the case in particular cause it’s an active investigation of ours. Rogers: It’s an active investigation for accomplices brokering in stolen information? Comey: We are looking at the totality of the circumstances around the theft and promulgation. Rogers: That’s very interesting.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Stelter: You're coming to us from Brazil. You haven't been back to the United States since the first stories were published last summer but you've hinted you're going to come back this spring. I want to bring that up because there's been claims in recent days from some government official they might hold you accountable and might try to prosecute you in some way. Let's play the exchange between the chairman of the house intelligence committee Mike Rogers and the FBI Director from earlier this week. Rogers: There have been discussions about selling of access to this material to both newspaper outlets and other places. Mr. Comey, to the best of your knowledge is fencing stolen material, is that a crime? Comey: Yes, it is. Rogers: And would be selling the access of classified material that is stolen from the United States government, would that be a crime? Comey: It would be. It's an issue that can be complicated if it involves a news gathering news promulgation function, but in general fencing or selling stolen property is a crime.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Stelter: Glen, your blood must boil when you hear that. What was your reaction to that? What do you think they’re trying to do by saying those kind of things? Greenwald: Extraordinary aspects to that attempt by Mike Rogers to suggest that journalists such as myself are engaged in criminal conduct or selling documents and the like. But first is that he's not only lying and he is lying, but he not only is lying but knows that he's lying. You know this is what Mike Rogers is notorious for in Washington. He’s just literally making things up and smearing political opponents and journalists he doesn't like. He recently did it when he said that there was indications that Edward Snowden was working with Russian intelligence and every major newspaper in the country said not only is there no evidence of that, but that investigators have said it's not the case, that he acted alone. But I defy Mike Rogers, if he wants to make that accusation, to come forward and present actual evidence that any journalist has stolen -- has sold documents or stolen material or engaged in any kind of criminality. He has no evidence. He's just making things up.
Glenn Greenwald
Journalist at The Intercept
CNNW 02/09/2014
Greenwald: But the second extraordinary aspect of it is what he's talking about, that process has always in the United States been called journalism where you go to media organizations when you have something to report. You get paid for your reporting and then you report it, what the public should know. What this is, is nothing less than an attempt to criminalize journalism like all petty tyrants try to do when reporters and other journalists expose that which they want to hide. And I don't think anybody should mistake what this is really about.
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